Appalling Abortion Bill in NY State Budget

Yes, in the state budget!!! The pro-abortion forces here in New York never rest. Now here’s their latest ploy: to put all their abortion priorities into the Fiscal Year 2019 Executive Budget and push them through with the rest of the finance-related bills before April 1.

Attached to Gov. Cuomo’s budget this year is a “Women’s Agenda” bill (S.7511/A.9511) that will actually enable and promote abortion.

Part A of this bill requires health insurance to provide “contraception” coverage that includes abortion-causing drugs.

Part B expands late-term abortion. It does this by removing all references to abortion from penal law. That means abortion would no longer be a crime. In other words, abortion would not be illegal for any reason at any time during a pregnancy — including into the ninth month and up to the moment of birth.

In addition, stripping abortion from New York’s Penal Law under Part B would mean that anyone who forced a pregnant woman to abort or attacked her violently to cause an abortion could not be charged of a crime against the baby.

Part B would also repeal Public Health Law Section 4164, which gives full legal protection to an a child who somehow manages to survive an abortion, and requires a second doctor to be present during a late-term abortion to give medical care to any such child. Part B would allow the abortionist to allow the child to die of neglect – and that would be infanticide.

Part B could also empower non-doctors to perform abortions. Under Part B, language would be removed that now says only a “duly licensed physician” may perform abortions in New York. With that language gone, the State Education Department bureaucrats would have the authority to decide who may perform an abortion. It’s likely abortion advocates would pressure them to allow abortions by nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse midwives, and a broad range of non-physicians – all to broaden the accessibility to abortion

Part B and the insurance mandate requiring abortion-causing drugs must be removed from the New York State budget. Those sections of the “Women’s Agenda” that have merit, such as those dealing with pregnancy discrimination and human trafficking, should be voted on as separate bills in the regular legislative process.

Please contact your legislators in Albany and ask them to oppose Governor Cuomo’s abortion expanding budget bill.

More information:

Here’s the text of the Women’s Agenda  (S.7511/A.9511) in the FY2019 New York State Executive Budget.

The New York State Catholic Conference Memo of Opposition

New York State Right to Life Committee Statement of Opposition

Will Gov. Andrew Cuomo Get His Abortion Legislation Passed? (New York Families)

Commentary: Proposed Budget’s Changes to Abortion Law Are Extreme (TimesUnion, 3/22/18)

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NY Assembly Passes Bills to Expand Abortion, Provide “Free” Contraceptive Coverage

Last night, the NY State Assembly passed two pro-abortion bills:

A. 1748, which could increase late-term abortions in the state, empower non-doctors to perform abortions, eliminate protections against unwanted abortions, and even jeopardize live-born children who survive abortion attempts. This passed by a vote of 97-49.  Voting FOR this bill: Ken Zebrowski (AD 96), Ellen Jaffe (AD 97) and Jim Skoufis (AD 99). A prolife vote AGAINST it was cast by Karl Brabenec (AD 98).

A. 1378, which requires insurance companies to provide “cost-free” contraceptive coverage, including potentially abortifacient drugs like the morning-after pill. Passed by a vote of 103-43. Again, voting FOR this bill: Ken Zebrowski (AD 96), Ellen Jaffe (AD 97) and Jim Skoufis (AD 99). A prolife vote AGAINST it was cast by Karl Brabenec (AD 98).

Also, keep in mind that “cost-free” coverage is not really free. Pharmaceutical companies were not giving away their contraceptive products last time we checked. Increased premiums from the insurance companies will probably cover the expense, and that could mean your money.

This bill left in place a provision from an earlier law whereby a “religious employer” may request a healthcare contract for its employees without coverage for these drugs and devices. That will work for organizations like churches, according to the law’s definition of what a “religious employer” is. Unfortunately, it does not protect the private employer who because of his religious beliefs opposes abortion or contraception.

Both these bills are versions of similar legislation, which the Democratic majority in the Assembly has been pushing through on a party-line vote each year. Fortunately, it never reached the floor of the Senate, where the Republicans have a slim majority — one vote this year. We must work to make sure these bills do not become law in New York.